This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia









Submission

National Waste Policy




Managing Waste to 2020 Consultation Paper




Executive Summary

This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia.


The Eastern Metropolitan Regional Council This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia (EMRC) is a local government organisation working on behalf of six member Councils in Western Australia. EMRC delivers a wide range of services to member Councils; however our core business has This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia always remained waste management services. Consequently this submission focuses strongly on local government waste services.


EMRC’s priorities for a national waste policy are:


^ Table of Contents

Executive Summary i

1Introduction This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia 1

1.1About the EMRC 1

1.2Red Hill 1

1.3Hazelmere 2

1.4Transfer stations 3

^ 1.5Future developments 3

2Response to questions 4

QUESTION 1: Are there opportunities to further coordinate, harmonise or streamline approaches to waste management across jurisdictions? 4

QUESTION 2: Are the This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia categorisations, definitions and standards used to manage waste between and within the different levels of government effective and appropriate? 4

^ QUESTION 3: Do the current waste management frameworks across jurisdictions: 5

QUESTION 5: What This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia waste issues would most benefit from a national approach? What strategies could be considered and how could the need for local solutions be integrated with a national approach? 6

^ QUESTION 6: Are there waste management initiatives This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia in operation overseas that could apply in the Australian context? If so, which ones and why? 7

QUESTION 7: Australia needs to safely manage hazardous waste and waste containing hazardous materials over the long term This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia. Are there any changes to current arrangements that would improve Australia’s capability to safely manage hazardous waste, for example in regard to adequate infrastructure or disclosing the contents of goods This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia and substances? 7

^ QUESTION 8: There are a number of approaches to product stewardship operating in Australia. 7

QUESTION 9: Are there any aspects of waste management that could be improved or streamlined through adopting national standards This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia? 8

QUESTION 10: What fundamental data sets does Australia need to collect to better inform waste management policies, practices, investment, business operations and to assess and manage risk? 8

^ QUESTION 11: What, if any This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia, place should there be for approaches that seek to avoid waste through changes in design, production processes and transport? 9

QUESTION 12: What changes could be мейд to improve management of the municipal waste This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia stream and those of the commercial and industrial sector and the construction and demolition sector? 10

QUESTION 13: Landfill is currently the primary means of waste disposal. What, if any, changes need to be мейд to This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia manage Australia’s waste stream in the long term given current trends in the volume and nature of the waste? 10

QUESTION 14: Reducing the amount of organic waste sent to landfill This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia has the potential to contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions as well as other potential environmental and economic benefits. What are the benefits and opportunities, costs and disadvantages of increased diversion and/or This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia recycling of organic wastes? 10

^ QUESTION 15: What, if any, changes are needed to the way e-waste is managed? 12

QUESTION 16: The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme will apply to emissions from landfill. Are This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia there related approaches that would complement the scheme and thus contribute to meeting the emissions targets and the timeframes set in the Australian Government’s climate change policy? 15

^ QUESTION 17: What are the opportunities to This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia reduce water and energy use through the way waste is managed? 15

QUESTION 18: In what ways can waste management and resource recovery (including recycling, re-processing, re-manufacturing) industries add further value to This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia the economy and create employment? 16




  1. Introduction

Please find following the submission of the Eastern Metropolitan Regional Council (EMRC) to the Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts “A national waste policy This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia: managing waste to 2020 consultation paper”. In this submission we introduce ourselves, respond to the questions raised in the consultation paper and provide suggestions for what we would like to see in This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia a national waste policy.


Please note that, due to the time constraints imposed by the brief consultation period, this submission is not as complete as it could be.

    1. ^ About the EMRC

The EMRC is This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia a regional local government in Perth’s Eastern Region. We provide a range of services to our six member Councils, which are Bayswater, Bassendean, Belmont, Kalamunda, Mundaring and Swan. The longest This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia running of these services is waste management which has been provided since our inception in 1983. We consider ourselves to be a Centre of Excellence for waste management with a фокус on This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia providing cost effective, feasible solutions for member Councils and other customers.


The EMRC currently operates five facilities on behalf of the member Councils. These are:

    1. Red Hill

Red Hill is situated approximately 30 km from the Perth CBD, and includes one of Perth This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia’s largest landfills with dedicated cells for putrescible waste and contaminated soil, a green waste processing facility and a transfer station where recyclables are aggregated and sent on to material processors This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia. Red Hill is Western Australia’s sole landfill for Class IV waste (contaminated waste that exceeds limits for Class III contaminated waste).


Red Hill is run as a commercial operation, and competes strongly This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia in the market for commercial waste. The EMRC has purchased land on the open market to ensure that the buffer areas cannot be developed and has the appropriate zoning and This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia licences to operate for several decades, if necessary, at the current waste receival rates.


The landfill is run as a Best Practice facility, with composite lined cells, leachate collection, gas collection for This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia power generation and progressive site rehabilitation and post closure management. The EMRC continues to improve its operations, with improvement being driven internally and by community liaison meetings held bi-monthly at Red Hill This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia. Some of the improvements that have been implemented in the last two years are:



None of these improvements were driven by regulatory requirements, but were instead implemented as part This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia of the EMRC’s long term view on best practice site operations. Indeed, Red Hill receives very few residential complaints, no non-compliance notices from the Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia), and takes considerable trouble to report any environmental aspects to the DEC as they occur (including landfill fires, groundwater contamination and non-compliant loads). Again, this is in excess of other This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia site operators.


The EMRC has developed a rigorous procedure for the acceptance of Class III and Class IV waste, a procedure far in excess of that demanded by the DEC This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia. This is again to mitigate risks to the EMRC from non-compliant loads, although it does place the EMRC at a substantial commercial disadvantage against operators that have less robust procedures and This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia a general disinterest in the long term fate of potential contamination from their site. Unfortunately, the regulation of contaminated waste movement within WA is quite lax – our regular notifications of Class IV waste “disappearing” has This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia not yet managed to attract the interest of regulators.


Green waste processing is undertaken by mulching and composting green waste received to produce a mulch and soil conditioner. The EMRC also This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia accepts green waste from an organics bin (i.e. third kerbside bin) offered by the City of Bayswater to its residents. Our composting operations are driven by quality requirements for the sale of This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia the mulch and compost. The EMRC is investing substantial human and financial capital into the development of a high quality product, as well as working with the industry to This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia ensure that the overall market for mulch and compost is strengthened. The EMRC hopes to have certification of its mulch and compost against Australian Standard AS 4454 this year.

    1. Hazelmere

Hazelmere is a 10 hectare lot purchased by This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia the EMRC several years ago for the purpose of establishing resource recovery activities. Operations on the site currently involve the recycling of untreated softwoods such as pallets, into a range This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia of products (as sought by the market). Some of the products include:


The timber recycling concept developed from a pilot scale project conducted by the Laminex Group together with a pre-feasibility conducted by the City of Swan, and has been accompanied by strong support from This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia our member Councils, the Laminex Group, and the poultry industry.


Since no member Council generates significant quantities of wood waste, the target market for Hazelmere is industry, and the purpose is to This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia avoid the timber being disposed of to Red Hill landfill, and to reduce waste disposal costs for industry. The facility has been successful in both of these objectives, having recovered over 9,000 tonnes This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia in its first year, saving waste generators up to $35.00 per tonne of timber received.


The benefit to our member Councils is that it enables them to support their local industries, and the This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia City of Swan has been particularly active in its support of the facility by providing wood waste collections through its industrial areas. The reduced cost of waste disposal improves the This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia financial resilience of local industries and consequently protects local employment.


Hazelmere is in the process of expanding to also receive hardwoods, with the hardwoods to be used for solid fuel as This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia well as wood fines for animal bedding. In all cases, we have not brought on new products until markets are available. This practice is relatively uncommon in the waste industry, where new waste processing This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia capacity is often developed before markets for the processed product are secured.


A further activity in the process of being developed is a mattress recycling plant, where springs, foam and fabric are This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia separated from mattresses for subsequent recycling (where possible). In particular, foam is a valuable commodity with markets already secured. This programme is driven largely by the potential to save on landfill; mattresses consume This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia substantial volume within the landfill.


In the future, Hazelmere is intended to become an integrated Resource Recovery Park (RRP), with an initial concept plan developed for the RRP. The RRP This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia will include the current timber and mattress recycling as well additional resource recovery. This is currently envisaged to include a Materials Recovery Facility, transfer station for the public, reuse shop, glass This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia beneficiation, education centre and space for commercial developments associated with waste processing.

    1. ^ Transfer stations

The EMRC operates three transfer stations on behalf of the member Councils. In all cases, the relevant member Council leases the land This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia and owns the infrastructure on the site, with the EMRC managing the operations. EMRC management has led to improvements in the operation of all sites, and enabled member Councils to This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia have more input into the site operation. In particular, recycling from the sites has been enhanced in breadth and ease of use.


The integration of waste facility management across Perth’s This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia Eastern Region is enabling the EMRC and its member Councils to plan for waste management right across the Region, picking up a role that is periodically attempted metro-wide by the DEC or Waste This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia Authority. The regional waste planning has been developed into the Strategic Waste Management Plan.

    1. ^ Future developments

The EMRC is continually exploring and developing resource recovery activities. These resource recovery activities are required to be This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia commercially viable or reducing a long term EMRC liability. In deciding on wastes to be processed to recover materials, the EMRC may consider wastes that are simple to handle (such as This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia glass), hazardous waste that potentially pollutes the environment (such a fluorescent lights) or low density waste that consumes large volumes of landfill airspace (such as timber or cardboard).


The EMRC is This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia also investigating non-landfill alternatives to waste management (i.e. Alternative Waste Treatment). This is being undertaken by a thorough research and consultation process in which residents are able to provide input This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia at all points, thus ensuring that any system developed meets their needs.


  1. ^ Response to questions

This section provides responses to the questions raised in the consultation paper.

QUESTION 1: Are there opportunities to further coordinate This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia, harmonise or streamline approaches to waste management across jurisdictions?

Product stewardship/EPR

National EPR schemes should be developed to remove wastes with recovery potential. A coordinated national approach will ensure manufacturers This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia take responsibility for their product stewardship obligations in each state and territory. This is discussed more thoroughly in questions 8 and 15.

Unified resource recovery targets and goals

Each state and territory has set individual visionary resource This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia recovery goals – whether it is: “towards zero waste”, “zero waste”, or “zero waste to landfill”. National direction with sustainable and realistic targets would help in harmonising the goals, and help establish the optimal This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia level of infrastructure for resource recovery across Australia.

^ QUESTION 2: Are the categorisations, definitions and standards used to manage waste between and within the different levels of government effective and appropriate This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia?

Definitions

There is limited standardisation across all levels of government, between jurisdictions and within the waste industry. The varying definitions of waste types, technologies and categories cause confusion and can affect approvals, classifications This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia and responsibility to pay.


An example of this is the use of the term ‘product stewardship’ within this consultation paper. The consultation paper indicates that product stewardship can be voluntary / industry regulated or This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia mandatory / government regulated. In Western Australia, under the WARR Act, product stewardship is voluntary and Extender Producer Responsibility (EPR) is regulatory.


The lack of uniform definition and classification system often prevents meaningful data This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia aggregation and cross referencing. The definitions of waste types need to be standardised across Australia to allow for better comparisons between jurisdictions. Ideally they should be defined inline with any international trends This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia so that Australia can be compared to other countries.


Recommendation: The Commonwealth Government should work with state and territory governments to develop and implement national definitions of waste terminology and a national This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia waste classification system.


Standards

Although there is a national standard for bin and lid colours pertaining to the different waste and recycling materials, this is not consistently adhered to. This causes This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia confusion for people who move, visit or are passing through different areas that have different colours that their own jurisdiction. Enforcing the standard would be extremely advantageous for education purposes.


QUESTION 3: Do the This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia current waste management frameworks across jurisdictions:


Varying regulation across jurisdictions results in This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia:


National projects tend to be dominated by the large states, the state government agencies which have more staff and This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia resources to allocate to such projects. This can lead to measures being implemented that are not productive, or are even counter-productive, to the smaller states and territories.


Key Point This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia: There is a role for national regulation and legislation for waste management issues that extend across the majority Australia’s jurisdictions. National legislation must consider the impacts on all areas of Australia.



There has been limited strategic planning for and integration of resource recovery activities into other planning schemes at a state level, and no This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia coordination at a national level. In similar fashion to roads, parks, hospitals, electricity and water, resource recovery requires planning support to facilitate infrastructure provision.


^ Key Point: Resource recovery activities require adequate planning This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia support to facilitate infrastructure provision.



Local government is essentially responsible for managing waste, yet little incentive is provided This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia to encourage resource recovery and diversion from landfill strategies. The lack of an external driver for resource recovery means that Councils are forced to make long term decisions that are against their short This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia term interests (typically being more expensive than the landfill alternative). Getting these decisions мейд is difficult, but not impossible, and the fact that the only reduction in waste to landfill has been observed in This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia municipal waste.


The purpose of landfill levies should be мейд clear. We suggest that landfill levy should фокус upon internalising economic externalities (typically environmental), encouraging resource recovery and funding government programmes that This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia support resource recovery. This would lead to, for instance, lower leveies for landfills that demonstrate high levels of methane capture and diversion strategies.



Different jurisdictions have different priorities, legislation and resource recovery targets; however there are wastes identified as a priority for most jurisdictions – e.g. e-waste. Priority wastes consistently This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia identified across a number of jurisdictions should be tackled at a national level.


The most effective method for managing waste at a national level is through product stewardship schemes. Government regulated product stewardship schemes This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia achieve economies of scale and optimum environmental outcomes. This is discussed further in Question 8 and 15.


There should also be a clear process for identifying waste management priorities at a national level. This should This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia include a reporting structure for state and local governments to identify emerging problematic wastes.


Key Point: Priority wastes identified across the majority of jurisdictions should be managed at a This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia national level through product stewardship schemes. The Federal Government should develop a clear process for identifying national waste priorities.

QUESTION 5: What waste issues would most benefit from a national approach? What strategies could be considered This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia and how could the need for local solutions be integrated with a national approach?

The Commonwealth Government has limited constitutional powers to engage directly in domestic waste issues, as responsibility largely lies This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia with state, and therefore local governments. The role of federal government has evolved, however it now has a strategic involvement in waste policy development with a particular фокус on developing This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia consistent national approaches for key product sectors.

Product stewardship

A national approach to (regulated) product stewardship schemes will provide uniform legislation ensuring manufacturers adopt product stewardship regulations in every Australian state and This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia territory.


While some states have legislation to introduce product stewardship schemes, benefits are more likely to be achieved if implemented at a national level. National product stewardship schemes should be developed for priority This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia wastes identified by a majority of jurisdictions. These are most likely to include:



Market development for recycled products

Creating demand and sustaining markets for recycled products and materials can only be This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia done efficiently and consistently at a national level. Recycled products, including recycled organics, need to be demand driven in order to be sustainable. Government intervention would enable products that are currently disadvantaged This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia due to market failures, to be competitive in the market until they are able to sustain their own markets.


To get the most benefit from recycling, markets for high quality use of This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia materials and resources (displacing virgin materials) need to work more efficiently. The government should develop a centre of expertise on export markets to help business and local government manage market This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia risks, maintain value of recycled materials and comply with export controls.


Key Point: The Government should develop a centre of expertise on export markets to help business and local government maintain value for recycled This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia products and comply with export controls.

^ QUESTION 6: Are there waste management initiatives in operation overseas that could apply in the Australian context? If so, which ones and why?

United Kingdom – landfill disposal This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia allowance

The United Kingdom has legislation prescribing a landfill disposal allowance. The allowance is able to be traded, but where it is exceeded, a substantial penalty is applied. Furthermore, highly attractive tariffs are paid This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia for the generation of heat and power from waste. The suite of legislated incentives has created an economic environment where waste processing plants have a payback period of less than five This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia years. This becomes extremely attractive for investors, and should be investigated for Australia.

US Composting Council

The US Composting Council has a ‘Seal of Testing Assurance Program’ that ensures organic recyclers This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia provide a minimum level of product information to their customers. Compost Australia has facilitated an Australian product certification scheme, based on Australian Standard 4454-2003 (composts, soil conditioners and mulches) but this has not yet been This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia widely adopted by organic waste recyclers.

QUESTION 7: Australia needs to safely manage hazardous waste and waste containing hazardous materials over the long term. Are there any changes to current arrangements that would improve This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia Australia’s capability to safely manage hazardous waste, for example in regard to adequate infrastructure or disclosing the contents of goods and substances?

Product Stewardship / Extended Producer Responsibility

The principle of government regulated This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia product stewardship, as discussed in question 8, must be recognised as having particular reference to the management of hazardous waste – particularly hazardous waste consumed at a domestic level.

Education

The principle This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia of waste minimisation, which sits at the top of the waste management hierarchy, is particularly important in the case of hazardous waste and should be given priority as a message in education This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia campaigns and in negotiation with the manufacturers of hazardous waste. Currently, there is a lack of communication and education in waste minimisation and responsible disposal options for hazardous materials.

^ QUESTION 8: There are This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia a number of approaches to product stewardship operating in Australia.


A large part of the costs of waste management would be dealt with by product stewardship schemes. Part of the cost associated with waste This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia management is incurred in managing waste streams that can be directly traced back to a particular manufacturer. If manufacturers contributed to the cost of managing their products upon disposal, there would be significant savings This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia for local government.


The current model is for such costs to be borne almost solely by local government, and is thus spread evenly across society (essentially having society subsidise the behaviour This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia of the few that use materials which require extensive management). This is not only unfair, but it is poor economies as it removes incentives for polluters to make decisions that create This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia less pollution.


The savings to local government from product stewardship schemes are particularly important where waste streams are of high toxicity within standard disposal pathways (e.g. e-waste and CFLs) as the cost This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia of managing these wastes is high. Local government money can be better spent delivering education programs around these wastes.


National product stewardship schemes would provide uniform regulation that directly ensures This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia manufacturers adopt their product stewardship obligations in every Australian state and territory. Effective regulation will also ensure the best possible environmental outcome.


A product stewardship model regularly proposed and ridiculed by manufacturers This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia is for manufacturers to take responsibility of the waste themselves. This is, wastes are collected and delivered back to the manufacturers. Supporters argue that such a model would encourage manufacturers to change product designs to This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia enable simpler recycling. It is doubtful that manufacturers, who export all over the world, would change product designs based on Australian legislation. However, manufacturers are best are keeping to their core business This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia of manufacturing.


A national product stewardship framework exists with the Product Stewardship Scheme for Oil, introduced by the Commonwealth Government in 2001. This simplistic framework could easily and promptly be applied This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia to a number of other waste streams including e-waste (computers, televisions and home entertainment equipment), compact fluorescent lamps, tyres and whitegoods.


This model requires manufacturers to pay for the management of their waste This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia, rather than requiring them to manage the waste themselves. This framework also enables current logistical and economically efficient collection models to be retained, but removes the financial burden of recycling This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia off local government.


^ Key Point: The Product Stewardship Scheme for Oil framework can easily and promptly be applied to a number of additional other problematic wastes.

QUESTION 9: Are there any aspects of This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia waste management that could be improved or streamlined through adopting national standards?

Use of recycled products

Recovered resources are often discriminated against on the basis of being ‘recycled’, rather than being assessed based This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia on their performance. This is a significant barrier to local market growth. The development of national standards, across significant material types, to assure secondary resource performance and allow comparison with other commodity choices are This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia needed to over come this barrier. This may include ‘fit for purpose’ standards for products derived from waste.

QUESTION 10: What fundamental data sets does Australia need to collect to This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia better inform waste management policies, practices, investment, business operations and to assess and manage risk?

Australia doesn’t have the fundamental data sets to support informal business decisions across all waste management and resource recovery This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia sectors. Accurate information is needed to support and inform decisions for the future of the industry.

Waste generation and diversion statistics

Waste management statistics have long centred on the diversion of waste from This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia landfill, with the goal being to maximise the diversion of waste from landfill. The statistics have long been inaccurate and poorly reported.


The lack of useful, reliable and consistent This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia data in regards to waste generation, consumption and reuse/recycling make it difficult to undertake sound decision making and policy formulation. Improved data collection is essential if current market failures are to be addressed. Data This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia may be expensive to collect, but it is very difficult to formulate policy responses to reduce the amount of waste generated with large data gaps.


More accurate data on the breakdown of This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia the types of products going to landfill will assist in developing strategies to reduce waste.


States and territories should report on the basis of a common methodology for data collection This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia, including:


Once this data is being efficiently recorded and reported, additional data that will become useful is the volume of virgin and recycled materials used in manufacturing This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia.

Recycling facilities across Australia

A centralised and accessible database of recycling facilities across Australia will assist local government and recyclers identify potential markets for their recyclables.

True cost of landfill

There is very little This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia data available to compare the economic, environmental and social benefits of resource recovery efficiency with traditional method of landfill. In Australia the environmental impacts of landfills have not been fully realised, when comparing This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia to the environmental monitoring and reporting requirements of Australia with Europe. The environmental monitoring and reporting requirements in Europe have a significant impact on waste disposal costs and in return This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia encourage resource recovery, whilst still meeting required levels of environmental performance.

^ QUESTION 11: What, if any, place should there be for approaches that seek to avoid waste through changes in design, production processes and This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia transport?

Packaging levy

Packaging should be limited to the function of containing a product and protecting it during transport. Additional packaging, purely for advertising should be heavily levied with funding generated going to resource This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia recovery efforts.

Lifecycle analysis

A lifecycle analysis needs to be undertaken when assessing whether resource recovery is the best option or whether to use virgin products. The analysis will need to compare the disposal This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia options with resource recovery options, but also look at products being designed to avoid wastes.

QUESTION 12: What changes could be мейд to improve management of the municipal waste stream and those of This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia the commercial and industrial sector and the construction and demolition sector?

The municipal waste stream is well managed and regulated by local government. A clear methodology for improving recycling rates is This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia the introduction of product stewardship schemes. The introduction of product stewardship schemes would result in significant savings for local government, particularly for wastes are of high toxicity within standard disposal pathways (e This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia.g. e-waste and CFLs) as the cost of managing these wastes is high. Local government money can be better spent delivering education programs around these wastes.

Source Separation

The waste stream This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia heterogeneity can be reduced by having waste generators sort the waste for separate collection. This is currently undertaken for recyclables where the householder sorts waste into separate bins. Some Councils also provide a This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia bin for garden/organic waste. There is obviously a limit to how many different waste streams are collected separately; each separate bin incurs costs in bin purchase and emptying, and This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia so some more concentrated waste streams (such as household batteries) are sorted and taken to drop-off centres. The key factor in cost control is to maximise the purity of the separated waste stream This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia and thus control local government spend substantially on waste education around contamination control.

QUESTION 13: Landfill is currently the primary means of waste disposal. What, if any, changes need to be мейд to manage This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia Australia’s waste stream in the long term given current trends in the volume and nature of the waste?

Landfills will always be required for waste management. The primary change that is This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia needed for sustainable landfill is to look at the “single generation” landfill, that is, a landfill that has stabilised and presents no environmental threat within a single generation. This will require This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia active management of the landfill conditions, and is discouraged in most Australian jurisdictions for the so-called “dry tomb” landfill which seeks to keep the landfill dry, unstable and thus a This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia perpetual risk to society.

QUESTION 14: Reducing the amount of organic waste sent to landfill has the potential to contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions as well as other potential environmental and economic benefits. What This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia are the benefits and opportunities, costs and disadvantages of increased diversion and/or recycling of organic wastes?

Organic wastes have the potential to both create and manage significant environmental This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia concerns. Adequately processed organic matter can be an important component of soil quality and performance. In addition to providing a reservoir of plant nutrients, such organic matter makes significant contributions to:

Alternative Waste Treatment (AWT)

The treatment of waste by alternative waste treatment (AWT) is uneven across Australia. According to the Productivity Commission This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia, there are five AWT plants in Australia for the processing of MSW. The submission from the WMAA NSW Alternative Waste Treatment Working Group suggests that three of these are in NSW. As the This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia remainder of the WMAA NSW Alternative Waste Treatment Working Group submission on the Productivity Commission website is corrupted, the remaining two can only be inferred to be the two WA plants This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia (SMRC in Canning Vale and Atlas Group in Mirrabooka). However, given that there is an additional plant known to be in Cairns, it appears that there is a total of six plants This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia receiving MSW in Australia.


According to the WMAA NSW Alternative Waste Treatment Working Group submission, the total MSW treatment capacity in NSW is 230,000 tonnes per year. The report ^ Assessment of Waste Disposal and Material This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia Recovery Infrastructure for Perth suggests that the capacity for the two WA plants is 181,000 tonnes per year. The July/August 2008 issue of Inside Waste states that the Cairns plant has a capacity of This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia 110,000 tonnes per year.


It should be noted that both NSW and WA have new AWT processing capacity being added. In NSW, a further 310,000 tonnes of processing capacity is being constructed This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia at Eastern Creek (WSN Environmental), Penrith (Sita), Woodlawn (Veolia), and Coffs Harbour (Biomass Solutions) bringing the total capacity to 540,000 tonnes per year. In WA, a further 155,000 tonnes of processing capacity is This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia under construction at Brockway (Anaeco) and Neerabup (Sita), making the total capacity 336,000 tonnes per year.


The AWT processing capacity as a proportion of total waste generation in the State which have AWT is tabulated below This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia:


State

MSW generation

^ Current AWT

Total including new plants




Tonnes/yr

Tonnes/yr

% of total MSW

Tonnes/yr

% of total MSW

NSW

3,326,000 (02/03)

230,000

7%

540,000

16%

WA

1,353,000 (06/07)

181,000

13%

336,000

25%

Qld

1,742,000 (02/03

110,000

6%

110,000

6%


This type of shift in treatment of MSW represents a significant investment by local government and the community This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia in waste management. The technology also represents a substantial increase in the amount of MSW diverted from landfill and the consequent greenhouse gas emissions (GHG).


AWT’s also have an opportunity to This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia process commercial organic waste; if disposal prices are comparable or cheaper than landfill.

Market Development

Market development is the key component to improved/increased diversion of organics from landfill. Although some work This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia has been undertaken by Compost Australia and local governments operating AWT’s,


Increased use of recycled organics is broadly stifled through:

^ QUESTION 15: What, if any, changes are needed to the way e-waste is managed?

With This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia approximately 312,930 tonnes of e-waste sent to landfill in 2005, and reports that e-waste is growing at a rate 3-5 times greater than municipal waste; significant changes to the way e-waste is managed This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia in Australia are essential.


The current approach to managing e-waste is undefined and lacking direction. Australia is one of few developed countries that have failed to act decisively on e This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia-waste. At a time when end-of-life electronic products are proliferating in the marketplace, there is a need for the Federal Government to move quickly on intelligent policies and regulation.


Subject This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia to decisive leadership by the Commonwealth Government, millions of e-waste items could be diverted from landfill resulting in extensive materials recycling and improved management of potentially hazardous substances.


^ Key Point This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia: Decisive leadership by the Commonwealth Government has the potential to divert millions of e-waste items from landfill.

National e-waste classification/definition

To support the development of future e-waste policies and regulations, a This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia national classification/definition of e-waste is required. In many instances, e-waste is termed as electronic equipment, including televisions, computers, home entertainment equipment and peripherals. In some cases, such as the European This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia Union WEEE Direction, it can include kitchen appliances, power tools, and battery powered toys.


It is recommended that for the purpose of policy and regulation development in Australia, e This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia-waste be defined as ‘big ticket’ items that contain a high proportion of elements that are both valuable and a priority to divert from landfill. These include:

These items are recommended as This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia they are from well defines industry sectors with strong representative trade bodies and therefore have good potential for extender producer responsibility (ERR).


Small electronic items (hair dryers, toasters, kettles This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia etc) that contain a high proportion of plastic and few potentially toxic metals should be addressed following successful strategies to manage the higher value and more toxic items listed above.


The classification of e-waste This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia will need to be regularly reviewed as new products enter the market.


Key Point: A national description of what items are classed as ‘e-waste’, and therefore require management is essential This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia to the development of any policies or regulations.

Government regulated product stewardship

A national product stewardship scheme, regulated by the Commonwealth Government, will be the most effective and efficient method to manage This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia end-of-life electronics in Australia. Uniform national regulation will directly ensure that manufacturers of electronic and electrical items adopt product stewardship obligations in every Australian state and territory. Effective regulation will also ensure This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia the best possible environmental outcome.


While voluntary/industry-regulated schemes have proven successful for some waste streams, the multifaceted nature of the electronics industry (e.g. telecommunications, computers, televisions This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia) suggests cooperation of the numerous industry associations and manufacturers to introduce collaborative or complementary schemes is unlikely.


Some computer manufacturers have implemented voluntary product stewardship schemes in Australia, most notable Hewlett Packard This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia, Dell and Apple. These three brands have a collective market share of 44% (provided by Byteback), yet their voluntary schemes have had little impact on recycling rates, particularly among domestic users.


Most states and territories This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia are exploring individual approaches to manage e-waste. This is likely to result in a number of different approaches across Australia, including:


A national product stewardship scheme for e-waste should build upon the framework developed for the This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia Product Stewardship for Oil scheme introduced by the Commonwealth Government in 2001 – a levy-benefit system.


All producers and importers of classified ‘e-waste’ would make a financial contribution per item sold/imported which This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia is used to manage the product at the end of the product’s life. The levy should be:


Key Point: A national product This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia stewardship scheme, regulated by the government will be more effective in managing e-waste than individual state, territory and local government efforts.

Guidelines for auditing e-waste recyclers

The federal government should This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia develop guidelines for assessing e-waste recyclers. These guidelines could be used by government and industry when assessing / tendering for the provision of e-waste recycling services.


Ideally the state This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia and territory governments would be responsible for using these guidelines to audit the e-waste recyclers in their jurisdiction inline with their own legislation and environmental guidelines.


Regular auditing will alleviate the risk This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia of e-waste being poorly recycled – i.e. only recovering the high value components and irresponsibly disposing of the remaining items.


Key Point: To ensure e-waste is recycled inline with Australia’s This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia international commitments, guidelines should be prepared to assist government and industry audit e-waste recyclers.

Phasing in a national landfill ban

A progressive phase-in of a national landfill ban for This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia e-waste disposal would strongly support a product stewardship scheme. A disposal ban would encourage local government to introduce e-waste collection programmes. Local government have the potential to collect significant quantities This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia of e-waste.


Considerable фокус is placed on diverting domestic e-waste from landfill. Less emphasis is placed on the potential to capture large quantities of e-waste from the industry and government sector This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia. A report by Meinhardt in 2001, reported that government and industry represent 83% of computer sales in Australia. A landfill ban would ensure industry and government accept their responsibility to responsibly dispose of This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia e-waste.


A national landfill ban would guarantee increase tonnages of e-waste are diverted from landfill. This will provide recyclers with incentive to invest in new processing infrastructure and technologies This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia.


Some state and territory landfill classifications permit e-waste to be received at landfills that do not have an impermeable liner. The lack of landfill liner is of great concern as it makes This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia it more likely that leachate containing toxins from e-waste will leak into the surrounding environment. As an immediate action, the federal government should ban the disposal of e-waste to This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia landfills that do not contain an impermeable liner.


^ Key point: A national disposal ban to landfill for e-waste will strongly support a product stewardship scheme and increase diversion rates.

Engaging industry This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia and all levels of government

Government

The federal government must engage with all levels of government when developing policies, regulations or product stewardship schemes for managing e-waste. State and territory governments should be This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia responsible for implementing national guidelines in their jurisdiction, and local government responsible for implementing collection programs for domestic e-waste. Funding should be available for local governments, particularly those in rural and remote areas This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia, to off-set some of the costs associated with transporting e-waste to recyclers.


Recyclers

Policies should support the development and use of existing e-waste recycling technologies and infrastructure. This This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia includes a provision that Australian technologies should be supported where possible. For example, CRT Recycling in Australia specialises in recycling the cathode ray tube (CRT) glass found within televisions and computer monitors This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia. CRT Australia, which prepares CRT’s for glass-to-glass recycling, offer the most sustainable solution for CRT glass in Australia, yet many of Australia’s e-waste recyclers still opt to send This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia their CRT’s overseas because it is more cost effective.


Restrictions should be placed on export permits/approvals of e-waste components when a technology to recycle it exists within Australia This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia. This will support existing recycling operations, by providing them with increased tonnages and therefore economies of scale (which should be reflected in recycling fees). Supporting existing operations will also encourage investment in This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia new technologies and recycling facilities across Australia – which inturn will create new jobs, and reduce our dependence on overseas markets.


Manufacturers

The introduction of a government regulated product stewardship scheme will get manufacturers to This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia consider the recycling part of their products life cycle. With Australia joining many other countries to implement regulated e-waste solutions, overseas manufacturers will hopefully start to change product designs for ease This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia of recycling.


Funding should be мейд available for Australian electronics manufacturers to invest in technologies and innovative processing that:


Key Point: All levels of government, e-waste recyclers and manufacturers must be engaged in the development of any policies, regulations or schemes relating to the management of This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia e-waste

Switch to digital

The Federal Government is a pivotal player in the ‘switch to digital’. The government must play a significant role in developing and enforcing effective regulation that will allow the This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia diversion and recycling of analogue televisions to be implemented in a cost effective manner – i.e. the previously discussed recommendations.


More can be done to ensure the Communications and Environment portfolios achieve a higher This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia level of cooperation aimed at dealing with obsolete and discarded analogue televisions. When communicating the ‘switch to digital’ message, information on how to responsibly dispose of redundant analogue televisions should be мейд available This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia.


Key point: The Commonwealth Government can play a significant role in encouraging the recycling of obsolete analogue televisions as part of its “switch to digital” communications.

QUESTION 16: The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia will apply to emissions from landfill. Are there related approaches that would complement the scheme and thus contribute to meeting the emissions targets and the timeframes set in the Australian Government This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia’s climate change policy?

Investment in:

Product Stewardship

As discussed regularly through out this submission, product stewardship schemes have the potential to This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia divert large quantities of material from landfill to recycling, when local government is not burdened with the recycling costs.

^ QUESTION 17: What are the opportunities to reduce water and energy use This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia through the way waste is managed?

Investment in local reprocessing and recycling

Local reuse and recycling provides significant opportunities to reduce the use of energy through reducing transport requirements. For example, all glass This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia collected in Western Australia is sent to South Australia for recycling. Investment in local reprocessing, such as a glass recycling facility in WA, would reduce energy use in transporting materials large distances around Australia This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia.

QUESTION 18: In what ways can waste management and resource recovery (including recycling, re-processing, re-manufacturing) industries add further value to the economy and create employment?

The waste management and resource recovery This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia industries play a dual role, in dealing with society’s waste, but also generating products for reinsertion into the economy. With sensible regulations under-pinning, the opportunities for job creation in This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia the waste sector, and widespread materials recycling on a national basis, are unmatched and too significant to ignore.


Industry is prepared to invest billions of dollars in infrastructure and employ thousands This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia of people in resource recovery and recycling. It just requires the right regulatory and pricing signals to move. An example of this is the Sims E-Recycling Plant in Villawood, which This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia has the capacity to process 20,000 tonnes of e-waste per annum when operating at full capacity. Without decisive and regulatory action by government on the management of e-waste, it is unlikely the plant This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia will operate at full capacity or Sims will invest in similar infrastructure in other areas of Australia.


Legislation that supports Australian recycling and reprocessing industry will also add great value to This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia the economy and create employment. The afore mentioned Sims e-recycling exports recovered cathode ray tubes (CRT) screens overseas, even though a facility operates in Australia (CRT Australia). The Federal Government This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia should only grant export permits for products that do not have a recycling market in Australia. Improving the through-put of recyclables into Australian recycling facilities will create employment and the recycled products are cycled This submission makes a number of key points and recommendations in relation to the development of a national waste policy for Australia back into the Australian economy where possible.


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