This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office




SCHOOL OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE


MLitt in English Literary Studies


Session 2009-10

EL5052: Shakespeare and Renaissance Culture


20 Credits: 12 Weeks

Class Time: Wednesday 10-12, Venue: Taylor, C23





Convener: Dr Thomas Rist

Office: Taylor A39

Phone: 27832. Email: t.rist@abdn.ac.uk

Office This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office hours: TBA


Course team: Prof. Derek Hughes, Dr. Syrithe Pugh


This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office: Good Writing Guide; Guidance on Avoiding Plagiarism; MLitt This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office in English Literary Studies Programme Guide


COURSE INFORMATION


Course description


Since the eighteenth century the plays of Shakespeare have been celebrated as the high-water mark of English Literature; the gold in the golden This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office age of English Renaissance culture. But what impact did Shakespeare’s drama have on the audiences of the seventeenth century? Hamlet spoke of actors as the “brief chronicles of the time”, underlining the This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office central importance of theatre to the culture and debates of the period.  And within theatrical culture, Shakespeare’s success was beyond question, his contemporary and fellow playwright Ben Jonson, labelled him “the soul This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office of our age”.

In this course, taught by a team of specialists in renaissance literature, we respond to the plays as literature brimming with the energies and enthusiasms of its time. Close This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office study of a broad range of Shakespeare texts forms a central part of the course within a detailed investigation of their relationship with contemporary culture, informed by recent research in This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office the field.


^ Aims of the Course


The aims of the course are to:

• study a range of Shakespeare’s plays in depth

• gain knowledge of some important modern critical approaches to Shakespeare

• develop skills essential This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office to conducting research at postgraduate level


Set Text


Any modern, annotated, collected edition is acceptable, but we recommend ^ The Norton Shakespeare, ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al. (New York: W. W. Norton & Co, 1997), which is available This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office from Blackwell’s Bookshop. You may also choose to use editions of individual plays, such as the Arden, Oxford, New Arden, and Cambridge. These all contain substantial and informative critical introductions to This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office their plays.


^ COURSE STRUCTURE AND SEMINAR PROGRAMME

Reflecting some of the most prominent areas of recent Shakespeare Studies, this course divides into three parts: ‘Beliefs’, ‘ Rome’ and ‘Gender’. In the first section – Beliefs This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office – you are asked to read two plays per week; thereafter you read one play. The final week – Week 12 – will be devoted to student presentations. Relevant secondary reading for the three This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office parts of the course is listed immediately beneath this section.


^ Part 1: Beliefs (Dr Thomas Rist)

The English Reformations transformed the ways people saw the world. Traditional beliefs were suddenly superstition, new doctrines flourished This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office, and in the competition over correct outlooks, doubts and tensions grew. This section of the course considers Shakespeare’s examination of such tensions as he expressed them in a range of plays, viewing This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office them as, in Hamlet’s words, ‘the abstract and brief chronicles of the time’.

Weeks: Plays

  1. Macbeth and Othello

  2. The Comedy of Errors and The Winter’s Tale

  3. Richard III and Hamlet

  4. Love’s Labour’s This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Lost and Twelfth Night


Part 2: Rome (Professor Derek Hughes and Dr Syrithe Pugh)

The history of classical Rome furnished Shakespeare with a field in which he could explore, with relative freedom This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office, political ideas which were deeply relevant to his own society but often too dangerously iconoclastic to be discussed openly. We will consider questions of monarchy, empire, tyrannicide and republicanism raised by a selection This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office of Shakespeare’s ‘Roman’ works in the light of contemporary political debate, and trace Shakespeare’s awareness of the ideological work done by such literary retellings—of history as political myth-making This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office—through his handling of competing classical sources.


  1. Titus Andronicus

  2. Rape of Lucretia

  3. Julius Caesar

  4. Anthony and Cleopatra


Part 3: Gender (Prof. Derek Hughes and Dr Syrithe Pugh)

Shakespeare’s plays offer specific historic locations as This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office means of exploring political questions. These plays feature an imaginary realm in which a woman gains greater prominence but never total freedom.


  1. Midsummer Night’s Dream

  2. Merchant of Venice

  3. Winter’s Tale

  4. CLASS PRESENTATIONS – For details, see This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office below.

Secondary Reading for Part 1: Beliefs

Graham Bradshaw, Shakespeare’s Scepticism (1987)

Regina Buccula and Lisa Hopkins (eds), Marian Moments in Early Modern British Drama (2007)

John Cox, ‘Seeming Knowledge: Shakespeare and Skeptical Faith’, in ^ Anglican This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office and Episcopal History 77:4 (2008), 441-3

--Cox, The Devil and the Sacred in English Drama, 1350-1642 (2000)

Stephen Greenblatt, Hamlet in Purgatory (2001)

William Hamlin, Tragedy and Scepticism in Shakespeare’s England (2005)

Holland, Peter (ed) ^ Shakespeare Survey 54: Shakespeare This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office and Beliefs (2001)

Ken Jackson and Arthur Marotti, ‘The Turn To Religion in Early Modern English Studies’, in Criticism 46:1 (2004); this essay is usefully read in conjunction with Greenblatt, 2001, above)

Geoffrey Knapp This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office, Shakespeare’s Tribe: Church, Nation and Theatre in Renaissance England (2002)

Peter Lake, The Anti-Christ’s Lewd Hat: ^ Protestants, Papists and Players in Post-Reformation England (2002)

Jean-Christophe Mayer, Shakespeare’s This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Hybrid Faith: Religion and the Stage (2006)

Thomas Rist, ‘Shakespeare Now and Then: Communities, Religion, Reception’, in Writing and Religion in England: 1558-1689, ed. By Roger Sell and Anthony Johnson (November, 2009)

--Rist, ^ Shakespeare’s This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Romances and the Politics of Counter-Reformation (1999), especially chapters 3 and 4, on scepticism and magic.

--Rist, Revenge Tragedy and the Drama of Commemoration in Reforming England (2008), Introduction and Chapter 1.

--Rist, ‘On the Unity This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office of ^ Love’s Labour’s Lost’, in The Ben Jonson Journal 7 (2000); this edition contains a number of other relevant essays on Shakespeare and religion.

--‘Merry, Marry, Mary: Shakespearean Wordplay and Twelfth Night’, in Shakespeare This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Survey 62 (2009)

Michael Srigley, ^ The Probe of Doubt: Scepticism and Illusion in Shakespeare’s Plays (2000)

Denis Taylor, Shakespeare and the Culture of Christianity in Early Modern England (2003)

Richard Wilson (ed), Theatre and Religion (2003)

Gary This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Wills, Witches and Jesuits: Shakespeare’s MacBeth (1995)


Useful Historical and Cultural Background Reading:

Francis Dolan, ^ Whores of Babylon: Catholicism, Gender and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture (repr. 2005)

Eamon Duffy, The Stripping of the This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Altars: Traditional Religion in England (repr. 2005)

Ken Jackson and Arthur Marotti, ‘The Turn to Religion in Early Modern English Studies’, in ^ Criticism 46:1 (Winter, 2004)

Christopher Haigh, English Reformations: Religion, Politics and Society This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Under the Tudors (1993)

Popkin, Richard. The History of Scepticism: From Savonarola to Bayle (repr. 2003)

Alison Shell, Catholicism, Controversy and the English Literary Imagination, 1558-1660 (1999)


^ Secondary Reading for Part 2: Rome

Titus Andronicus

MacDonald P This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office. Jackson, ‘Stage Directions and Speech Headings in Act 1 of Titus Andronicus Q (1594): Shakespeare or Peele?’, Studies in Bibliography 49 (1996), 134 48;

MacDonald P. Jackson, ‘Indefinite Articles in ^ Titus Andronicus, Peele, and Shakespeare’, Notes and Queries 45 (243) (1998), 308 10

Brian Boyd This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office, ‘Common Words in Titus Andronicus: the Presence of Peele’, Notes and Queries, 42 (240) (1995) 300 07

Thomas Merriam, ‘Influence Alone? More on the Authorship of ^ Titus Andronicus’, Notes and Queries 45 (243) (1998) 304 08.

Robert S. Miola, ’Shakespeare's This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Ancient Rome: Difference and Identity’, in Michael Hattaway (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare's History Plays (Cambridge, England: Cambridge UP, 2002), pp. 193-213

Carol Chillington Rutter, ’Looking Like a Child; or, ^ Titus This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office: The Comedy’, Shakespeare Survey, 56 (2003), 1-26

Albert H. Tricomi, ‘The Aesthetics of Mutilation in Titus Andronicus’, in Catherine M. S. Alexander (ed.); Jonathan Hope (introd.), Shakespeare and Language (Cambridge, England: Cambridge UP, 2004), pp. 226-39

Marion Wynne Davies This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office, ‘“The Swallowing Womb”: Consumed and Consuming Women in ^ Titus Andronicus’, in The Matter of Difference: Materialist Feminist Criticism of Shakespeare, ed. Valerie Wayne, New York: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1991, pp. 129 51


The Rape of Lucrece

Catherine This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Belsey, ‘The Rape of Lucrece,’ in Patrick Cheney (ed.), ^ Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare’s Poetry (CUP 2007), pp. 90-107

Catherine Belsey, 'Tarquin Dispossessed: Expropriation and Consent in The Rape of Lucrece', Shakespeare Quarterly 52 (2001), 315-35

Martin Dzelzainis This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office, ‘Shakespeare and Political Thought,’ in ^ A Companion to Shakespeare ed. David Scott Kastan (Blackwell, 1999)

Lynn Enterline, The Rhetoric of the Body from Ovid to Shakespeare (CUP, 2000)

Coppelia Kahn, ‘Publishing Shame This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office: The Rape of Lucrece,’ in A Companion to Shakespeare’s Works, ed. Richard Dutton and Jean E. Howard (Blackwell, 2003), vol 4, pp. 259-274

Coppelia Kahn, ^ Roman Shakespeare: Warriors, Wounds and Women (1997)

Mary Jo This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Kietzman, ‘"What Is Hecuba to Him or [S]he to Hecuba?" Lucrece's Complaint and Shakespearean Poetic Agency,’ Modern Philology 97 (1999), 21-45

Annabel Patterson, Reading Between the Lines (1993)


Julius Caesar

Further Reading:

Rebecca Bushnell, Tragedies of Tyrants This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office: Political Thought and Theater in the English Renaissance (1990)

Robert S. Miola, Shakespeare’s Rome (1985)

------, ‘^ Julius Caesar and the Tyrannicide Debate,’ Renaissance Quarterly 38 (1985), 271-89

Annabel Patterson, Shakespeare and the Popular Voice (Oxford, 1989)

W. Rebhorn, ‘The This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Crisis of the Aristocracy in Julius Caesar,’ Renaissance Quarterly 43 (1990), 75-111


Antony and Cleopatra

Janet Adelman, The Common Liar; an Essay on ‘Antony and Cleopatra’ (New Haven, Yale University Press, 1973).

Mary Ann Bushman This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office, ‘Representing Cleopatra’, in ^ In Another Country: Feminist Perspectives on Renaissance Drama, ed. Dorothea Kehler and Susan Baker (Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow, 1991), pp. 36-49.

Sara Munson Deats, (ed.), Antony and Cleopatra: New Critical Essays. (London: Routledge This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office, 2005) (on order)

Juliet Dusinberre, ‘Squeaking Cleopatras: Gender and Performance in Antony and Cleopatra’, in Shakespeare, Theory and Performance, ed. James C. Bulman (London: Routledge, 1996), pp. 46-67.

Barbara Hodgdon, ‘Antony and Cleopatra in the This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Theatre’, in The Cambridge Companion to Shakespearean Tragedy, ed. Claire McEachern (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2002), pp. 241-63. (on order)

Michael Shapiro, ‘Boying Her Greatness: Shakespeare's Use of Coterie Drama in Antony and This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Cleopatra’, The Modern Language Review, 77:1 (1982)., 1-15.

Marilyn Williamson, ‘The Political Context in Antony and Cleopatra’, Shakespeare Quarterly, (21:3), 1970, 241-51

W. B. Worthen, ‘The Weight of Antony: Staging “Character” in ^ Antony and Cleopatra’, SEL: Studies This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office in English Literature, 1500-1900, 26:2 (1986), 295-308


Secondary Reading for Part 3: Gender

Midsummer Night’s Dream

C. L. Barber, Shakespeare’s Festive Comedy: A Study of Dramatic Form in Relation to Social Custom (Princeton, 1959).

Anne Barton, ^ Shakespeare and the Idea This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office of the Play (1962) [originally published under the name ‘Anne Righter’]

Louis Montrose, ‘A Kingdom of Shadows’, in David L. Smith, Richard Strier and David Bevington (eds.), The Theatrical City (Cambridge, 1995).

Patricia This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Parker, Shakespeare from the Margins: Language, Culture, Context (Chicago, 1996)

Annabel Patterson, ‘Bottom’s Up: Festive Theory in A Midsummer Night’s Dream,’ in ^ Shakespeare and the Popular Voice (Oxford, 1989); also in Dorothea Kehler This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office (ed.), A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Critical Essays (London, 1998).


The Merchant of Venice

Catherine Belsey, ‘Love in Venice’, Shakespeare Survey, 44 (1992), 41-53

René Girard, A Theater of Envy: William Shakespeare (Oxford and New This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office York: Oxford University Press, 1991)

Richard Levin, ‘The New Refutation of Shakespeare’, ^ Modern Philology, 83, 1985 86), 123 41 [Largely concerned with Macbeth, but answers Girard’s interpretation of The Merchant of Venice]

Kiernan Ryan, ‘The Merchant of Venice This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office: Past Significance and Present Meaning’, Shakespeare Jahrbuch, 117, 1981, 49 54

Richard Wilson, “The Kindly Ones: The Death of the Author in Shakespearean Athens.” ^ Essays and Studies 46 (1993): 1-24; also in Nigel Smith (ed.), Literature and Censorship (Cambridge, 1993).


The Winter This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office’s Tale

Janet Adelman, Suffocating Mothers: Fantasies of Maternal Origin in Shakespeare’s Plays (1992)

Linda Bamber, Comic Women, Tragic Men: A Study of Gender and Genre in Shakespeare (1982)

C This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office.B. Hardman, ‘Shakespeare's Winter's Tale and the Stuart Golden Age,’ RES 45 (1994), 221-29

Maurice Hunt, The Winter’s Tale: Critical Essays (1995)

Constance Jordan, Shakespeare’s Monarchies : Ruler and Subject in the Romances (1999)

Coppelia Kahn, Man This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office’s Estate: Masculine Identity in Shakespeare (1981)

Stuart M. Kurland, ‘"We Need No More of Your Advice": Political Realism in The Winter's Tale,’ ^ SEL 31(1991), 365-386

Carol Thomas Neely, Broken Nuptials in Shakespeare’s This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Plays (1985)


Presentations for EL5052

A presentation will comprise 20% of the overall assessment of the course. They will take place in Week 12, in an extended session which may run up until 1 pm This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office if necessary. Presentations should be around 10 minutes long. There will be 5 minutes for questions and responses from the floor after each paper, and the way in which you field such questions will be This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office taken into consideration when you are awarded your mark.


You may use handouts, powerpoint or the overhead projector if you wish. You should хэнд a paper copy of your This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office notes or a synopsis (up to a maximum of 500 words), together with any handouts, and a bibliography detailing your main sources of information, to Dr Rist before you begin the presentation, and provide him This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office with a copy of your powerpoint file and / or overheads, where used, by the end of the day. (This is required both to facilitate our assessment of the presentations, and to enable This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office the external examiners to review the exercise.)


Since the best measure of a presentation’s success is its audience’s interest and enjoyment, there will be an element of peer This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office assessment in this exercise. You will all be invited to fill in a simple form giving your responses to each presentation, and these remarks will be taken into consideration when a mark This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office is awarded.


The presentation must be related to a play or plays studied on this course. You should devise your own topic, and may choose to фокус on an aspect of the This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office primary text, a critical debate, editorial issues, or matters of historical context. (I advise that you start to think about this now, and feel free to run your idea for a topic past This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office the tutor at the break, or at the end of a seminar.) You may develop ideas from your presentation in your essay, due in January.


The criteria for assessing presentations are as This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office follows:


  1. CONTENT:


range and relevance of sources used

critical understanding of the materials presented

imaginative approach to the material

effectiveness in conveying key aspects of the topic


  1. STRUCTURE:


clarity of argument

signposting of stages of argument / sections of presentation

overall This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office coherence

clarity and effectiveness of introduction and conclusion


^ C. DELIVERY:


effective use of voice: pace, articulation, use of pauses

helpful and not distracting use of gesture or body language

good eye contact

rapport with audience

effective use This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office of handout and / or visual aids


Presentations will be assessed using the University’s Common Assessment Scale:


20, 19, 18 Outstanding

17, 16, 15 Very good

14, 13, 12 Good

11, 10, 9 Pass

8, 7, 6 Marginal fail

5 and below Clear fail

0 Token or no submission


Presentations in the 18 – 20 (“outstanding”) range will This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office draw on an imaginative range of sources in order to develop excellent range and diversity with acute critical analysis. The approach will provide a stimulating introduction to the material. Delivery will be This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office sharply focused, admirably clear, and structured so as to link key points. The handout (if used) will be interesting and informative. The style will be lively and stimulating as well as clear This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office and fluent and particularly well suited to the content; any use of audio-visual aids excellent.


Most presentations will be in the 15 - 17 (“very good”) range. Such presentations will offer information derived from This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office an imaginative range of relevant sources; they will develop a good range and diversity of material, effectively chosen for introductory purposes, and they will show solid critical understanding. Delivery will be clear and This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office well focused; the handout will be interesting and informative, and there will be good emphasis of key points. With fluent and audible speaking, assisted by good use of audio-visual aids, if appropriate This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office, the presentation will be stimulating for the audience, and the style will be well married to the content.


6. Presentations in the 12 – 14 (“good”) range will offer an adequate amount of information from standard This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office reference sources. They will develop a satisfactory range of material, appropriate to serve as an introduction, and they will show basic critical understanding of that material. Delivery will have This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office clarity and фокус; key points will be highlighted adequately, and the handout will be satisfactory. The presentation will engage the interest of the audience, perhaps by making modest use of audio-visual aids This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office, if appropriate, and delivery will be audible. The methods of presentation will be appropriate to the content.


7. Presentations in the 9 – 11 (“pass”) range will give evidence of being only minimally prepared and This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office will lack interrelatedness. They will present a limited quality and range of information and show only modest critical understanding. The material will be less than wholly relevant for introductory purposes. Delivery will lack clarity and This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office proper emphasis, фокус will be poor, and the handout will have gaps. Making little or no use of audio-visual aids, where these would have been appropriate, and partially inaudible This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office, the presentation will do little to arouse the interest of the audience, and the style will not be entirely appropriate to the content.


8. Presentations in the 0 – 8 (“fail”) range will show a serious This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office lack of preparation; information will be scanty, inappropriate or incorrect; delivery and style will be poor (e.g. inert reading of a script rather than engagement with the audience).


^ Useful General Reading

The suggestions This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office for further reading, both here and above, are intended only as a starting point. There is a wealth of secondary material available on Shakespeare, and it continues to grow at what might seem This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office an alarming rate. You are encouraged to explore further for yourself, by following up references in editions and critical material, searching the MLA bibliography and JStor, and consulting the This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office useful bibliographies of recent work on individual plays in the journal Shakespeare Survey.


Background

Julia Briggs, ^ This Stage-Play World: English Literature and its Background, 1580-1625 (Oxford, 1983).

Paul Cox, The Devil and the Sacred in This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office English Drama (Cambridge, 2000).

Park Honan, Shakespeare: A Life (Oxford, 1999).

Dennis Kay, Shakespeare: His Life, Works and Era (London, 1991).

Christopher Ricks, ed., Sphere History of Literature in English: English Drama to 1710 (London This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office, 1971).

Simon Trussler, ^ Shakespearean Concepts: A Dictionary of Terms, Conventions, Influences and Institutions, Themes, Ideas and Genres in the Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (London, 1989).


Criticism

Margreta De Grazia and Stanley Wells, eds, Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office (Cambridge, 2001).

Jonathan Dollimore, ^ Radical Tragedy, revised ed. (New York, 1989).

John Drakakis, ed., Alternative Shakespeares (London, 1985).

Terry Eagleton, William Shakespeare (Oxford, 1986).

Stephen Greenblatt, Shakespearean Negotiations (Oxford, 1988).

Germaine Greer, Shakespeare (Oxford, 1986).

Russ McDonald This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office (ed.), ^ Shakespeare: An Anthology of Criticism and Theory 1945-2000 (Oxford, 2004).

Laurie E. Maguire, Study Shakespeare: A Guide to the Plays (Oxford, 2003).

Kiernan Ryan, Shakespeare: Texts and Contexts (London, 2000).

David Scott Kastan, A This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Companion to Shakespeare (Oxford, 1991).

Brian Vickers, ^ Shakespeare: The Critical Heritage (London, 1974-81), 6 vols.

Stanley Wells, Shakespeare: A Bibliographical Guide, 2nd ed. (Oxford, 1990).

Stanley Wells, The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare Studies (Cambridge, 1986).


Language

N. F. Blake This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office, ^ The Language of Shakespeare (London, 1989). Originally published as Shakespeare’s Language: An Introduction (London, 1983).

Russ McDonald, Shakespeare and the Arts of Language (Oxford, 2001).

Frank Kermode, Shakespeare’s Language (London, 2001).

M. M This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office. Mahood, ^ Shakespeare’s Wordplay (1957)

Vickers, Brian, ed., The Artistry of Shakespeare’s Prose (London, 1968).


Sources

Thomas W. Baldwin, Shakespeare’s Smale Latine and Lesse Greeke (Urbana, 1944), 2 vols.

Jonathan Bate, Shakespeare and Ovid (Oxford This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office, 1983).

Richard Danson Brown and David Johnson, eds, ^ A Shakespeare Reader: Sources and Criticism (Macmillan, 2000).

Geoffrey Bullough (ed.), Narrative and Dramatic Sources of Shakespeare (London, 1957-75), 8 vols.

Stuart Gillespie, Shakespeare’s Books (London, 2001).

Charles and Michelle This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Martindale, ^ Shakespeare and the Uses of Antiquity: An Introductory Essay (1990)

Charles Martindale and A. B. Taylor (eds.), Shakespeare and the Classics (2004)

Robert S. Miola, Shakespeare and Classical Tragedy: The Influence This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office of Seneca (1992)

T. J. B. Spencer, ^ Shakespeare’s Plutarch: The Lives of Julius Caesar, Brutus, Marcus Antonius and Coriolanus in the Translation of Sir Thomas North (Harmondsworth, 1964).


Staging

Jonathan Bate and Russell Jackson, eds This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office, Shakespeare: An Illustrated Stage History (Oxford, 1996).

Andrew Gurr, Playgoing in Shakespeare’s London, 2nd ed. (Cambridge, 1996).

Andrew Gurr, ^ The Shakespearean Stage, 3rd ed. (Cambridge, 1982).

Andrew Gurr and Mariko Ichikawa, Staging in Shakespeare’s Theatres This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office (Oxford, 2000).

Michael Hattaway, Elizabethan Popular Theatre: Plays in Performance (London, 1982)

Kinney, Arthur F., ^ Shakespeare by Stages: An Historical Introduction (2003).

Meredith Anne Skura, Shakespeare the Actor and the Purpose of Playing This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office (Chicago, 1993).

J. L. Styan, Shakespeare’s Stagecraft (Cambridge, 1967).

Peter Thomson, Shakespeare’s Professional Career (Cambridge, 1994).

Robert Weimann, ^ Shakespeare and the Popular Tradition in the Theater (Baltimore, 1978).

Martin White, Renaissance Drama in This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Action: An Introduction to Aspects of Theatre Practice and Performance (London, 1998).


Shakespeare and theory

Susan Bennett, Performing Nostalgia: Shifting Shakespeare and the Contemporary Past (London, 1996).

James C. Bulman, ed., ^ Shakespeare, Theory, and Performance (London This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office, 1996).

Jonathan Dollimore, ‘Introduction: Shakespeare, Cultural Materialism and the New Historicism’, in Dollimore and Alan Sinfield (eds), Political Shakespeare: Essays in Cultural Materialism (Manchester, 1985).

Hugh Grady, The Modernist Shakespeare (Oxford, 1991).

Jean E. Howard, ‘The New This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Historicism in Renaissance Studies’ in Richard Wilson and Richard Dutton (eds), ^ New Historicism and Renaissance Drama (London, 1992).

Jean E. Howard and Scott Cutler Shershow, eds, Marxist Shakespeares (London, 2001).

Patricia Parker This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office and Geoffrey Hartman, eds, Shakespeare and the Question of Theory (New York, 1985).

Kiernan Ryan, ^ New Historicism and Cultural Materialism (London, 1996).


Film

Lynda Boose and Richard Burt, Shakespeare, the Movie (London, 1997).

------, Shakespeare, the This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Movie II (London, 2003).

Deborah Cartmell, Interpreting Shakespeare on Screen (Houndmills, 2000).

Rusell Jackson (ed.), Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare on Film (Cambridge, 2000).

Robert Shaughnessy (ed.), ^ Shakespeare on Film (London, 1998).


Assessment

Assessment is by one essay of This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office 3000 to 3500 words at the end of the course (80%) and a presentation (20%) in Week 12.


Essay topic: As developing your own research questions is a crucial aspect of postgraduate work students will be encouraged to formulate This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office their own topics for the essay. These must be negotiated with the course convener and explicitly agreed in writing no later than Thursday 17 December.


^ Submission date: The essay should be submitted This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office to the Office of the School of Language and Literature by noon on Monday 18 January 2010. It should be submitted using the School cover sheet which is available outside the Office.


Late submission: 3 marks This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office will be deducted for late submission (up to a week late) without supportive medical evidence. Essays submitted after this date will receive a NIL grade. Late submission of work on medical grounds This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office should be accompanied by a medical certificate which must be handed in to the School Office within seven days of the due date of the assessment. Self- certification is This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office not valid.


Disability: Students who have been granted an extension on the grounds of disability must submit within one week of the normal submission deadline. Further extensions can only be granted by This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office the Head of School.

Basis of assessment: Essays will be marked using the common assessment scale. Good essays will be identified by the application of new knowledge, methodology or theory, quality of argument, use of This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office evidence, relevance to topic and quality of expression. Inaccuracies in punctuation, spelling, grammar, idiom, referencing and bibliography, and sloppiness in presentation (numerous insertions, deletions, coffee stains, etc.) will be penalised by This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office the deduction of up to 4 marks. Essays should be word-processed.


^ Conventions of reference: students should use MHRA, MLA or Harvard conventions of reference.


General Regulations


Attendance


Attendance at all classes is This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office compulsory. Attendance records will be kept. Poor attendance or other misconduct wilt be reported to the Progress Committee of the School of Language and Literature. Students’ eligibility to proceed to the dissertation will This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office be dependent upon consistent attendance, preparation and participation.


^ Students should note the following regulation:


Requirements for Award of Postgraduate Taught Programmes


All students commencing a modularised postgraduate taught programme of study in 2009/10 will be required This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office to meet the following credit requirements:

Postgraduate Master’s Degree: 180 credit points, including at least 150 credit points at Level 5

^ Postgraduate Diploma: 120 credit points, including at least 90 at Level 5 Postgraduate Certificate This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office: 60 credit points, including at least 40 at Level 5


These changes to the requirements for awards were мейд by the Senate to ensure that awards are мейд in compliance with the Scottish Credit and This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Qualifications Framework (SCQF). This is a common national Framework for all awards in Scotland. Further information is available at www.scqf.org uk.


Accordingly, students failing to meet these credit requirements will be governed This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office by the terms of Regulations 7, 8, 9 and 10 of the General Regulations for Taught Postgraduate Awards, as appropriate.


In particular students should note General Regulation 8, which states:


In the case of a This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office candidate who has failed to complete satisfactorily a prescribed element of degree assessment at the time prescribed by Regulation 7, then the appropriate procedure from (a) to (d) below shall apply.


a This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office) If, but only if, the failure is on account of illness or other good cause, the candidate shall be required to submit themselves for assessment at the next available opportunity, and shall be permitted to This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office count the result of that assessment towards progression and programme award.


b) If the failure is the result of absence or non-submission for any other cause, the candidate This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office shall be awarded zero for the assessment concerned and shall not be permitted to progress to the next stage of the programme.


c) If the candidate has completed the assessment but been awarded a mark This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office on the Common Assessment Scale between 6 and 8 inclusive, and if they would otherwise be permitted to progress to the next stage of the programme, they shall be awarded the same This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office amount of unnamed specific credit, not exceeding 30 credit points in total, at level 3 for a Postgraduate Diploma or for a Master’s Degree and not exceeding 20 credit points in total, at level This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office 3 for a Postgraduate Certificate. Such level 3 credits will count towards achieving the overall credit requirement of the award in question.


d) If the mark awarded on the Common Assessment Scale is less than 6, the This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office candidate shall not be permitted to progress to the next stage of the programme.

Progression and awards in Taught Postgraduate programmes are governed by the Grade Spectrum (Postgraduate), full details This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office of which can be found at http://www.abdn.ac.uk/quality/appendix7x7. pdf


Plagiarism: Students will be required to familiarise themselves with the contents of the School handout Guidance on Avoiding This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Plagiarism, which is available from the School Office.


The definition of Plagiarism is the use, without adequate acknowledgement, of the intellectual work of another person in work submitted for assessment. A This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office student cannot be found to have committed plagiarism where it can be shown that the student has taken all reasonable care to avoid representing the work of others as his or her own.


Overlap This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Regulations: MLitt students are reminded that while written work may build on the oral presentations offered for a course they may not use work that has already been given credit as part of This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office an essay for another course in the Programme. If students are in any doubt about overlap or wish to write about a text they have written about elsewhere in the This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Programme they should discuss the issue with their tutor.


Moderation: A copy of all written work submitted will be kept by the course convener for scrutiny by the moderator and external examiner. Students are This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office reminded that any mark awarded is provisional until the work has been scrutinised by the external examiner.


^ Academic Appeals


The University’s Guidance Note on Academic Appeals can be obtained from the This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office Senate Office in the Registry or can be accessed at:

www.abdn.ac.uk/registry/appeals


It indicates that appeals committees will limit their consideration to matters of procedure, competency and This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office/or prejudice. Those involved in considering academic appeals will j review matters of academic judgement, which are solely for the person or committee that has мейд the academic judgement to determine. For an appeal to This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office be upheld, a student must have suffered material disadvantage.


Your attention is drawn to the following paragraph of the University’s Policy on Academic Appeals:

“Details of illness and/or other personal This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office circumstance which either has prevented students from taking an assessment or from meeting a deadline for the submission of assessed work, or which students believe may have affected their performance This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office in an assessment that contributes towards the result of a course or programme, will be accepted as grounds for appeal only if the Head of the relevant School has received written notification This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office of them no later than one week after the date on which a student submitted, or was due to submit, an assessment or on which a student appeared, or was due This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office to appear, for the assessment concerned. Where good reasons have prevented a student from notifying the Head of School within this period, the student should write to the Head of the School This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office as soon as is practicable and give details both of the illness and/or other personal circumstances and of the reasons why the Head of the School was not notified of the circumstances within the This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office prescribed period. Details reported after notification of the result will be accepted as grounds for appeal only in limited circumstances.”


The Vice-President (Advice & Support) in the Students’ Association This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office is available to help students considering submitting an appeal (tel: +44(0)1224

272965).


Student Complaints

The University aims to provide a welcoming and supportive environment for its students. However, occasionally students will encounter problems and difficulties. Complaints should be This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office addressed in the first instance to the person who is in charge of the University activity concerned, e.g. the Head of the relevant School about academic matters; the Head of This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office the relevant administrative section about the service that you receive; a Warden about residential matters. Your Adviser of Studies or the Students’ Association will assist you if you are unsure This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office how to pursue a complaint. The University’s Policy on Student Complaints is available at:

www.abdn.ac.uk/reqistry/appeals


The Vice-President (Advice & Support) in the Students Association is available to help This Course Guide should be read in conjunction with the following booklets available from the School Office students wishing to make a complaint (tel: +44(0)1224 272965).


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