The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682)


Мэри (Уайт) Роулендсон, англ. Mary (White) Rowlandson (около 1635—1637, Сомерсетшир, Великобритания — январь 1711, Колония Массачусетского залива) — жительница английской колонии на местности будущих США, взятая в плен индейцами[1][2]) во время войны короля Филипа и 11 недель находившаяся в плену The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682), пока её не выкупили. После освобождения она написала книжку о собственных испытаниях под заглавием «Божья власть и доброта: рассказ о похищении и освобождении госпожи Мэри Роулендсон» (The Sovereignty and Goodness of The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) God: Being a Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson). Книжка увлекательна как подробным описанием обычаев краснокожих «изнутри», так и описанием характеров пуританских поселенцев Новейшей Великобритании.


^ The Narrative of the The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682)

(excerpts)


The sovereignty and goodness of GOD, together with the faithfulness of his promises displayed, being a narrative of the captivity and The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, commended by her, to all that desires to know the Lord's doings to, and dealings with her. Especially to her dear children and relations. The second The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) Addition [sic] Corrected and amended. Written by her own хэнд for her private use, and now мейд public at the earnest desire of some friends, and for the benefit of the afflicted The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682). Deut. 32.39. See now that I, even I am he, and there is no god with me, I kill and I make alive, I wound and I heal, neither is there any The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) can deliver out of my хэнд.


On the tenth of February 1675, came the Indians with great numbers upon Lancaster: their first coming was about sunrising; hearing the noise of some guns, we looked out; several The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) houses were burning, and the smoke ascending to heaven. There were five persons taken in one house; the father, and the mother and a sucking child, they knocked on the head The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682); the other two they took and carried away alive. There were two others, who being out of their garrison upon some occasion were set upon; one was knocked on the head, the other The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) escaped; another there was who running along was shot and wounded, and fell down; he begged of them his life, promising them money (as they told me) but they would The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) not hearken to him but knocked him in head, and stripped him naked, and split open his bowels. Another, seeing many of the Indians about his barn, ventured and went out, but was The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) quickly shot down. There were three others belonging to the same garrison who were killed; the Indians getting up upon the roof of the barn, had advantage to shoot down The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) upon them over their fortification. Thus these murderous wretches went on, burning, and destroying before them.


At length they came and beset our own house, and quickly it was the dolefulest day that The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) ever mine eyes saw. The house stood upon the edge of a hill; some of the Indians got behind the hill, others into the barn, and others behind anything that could shelter them The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682); from all which places they shot against the house, so that the bullets seemed to fly like hail; and quickly they wounded one man among us, then another, and then a The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) third. About two hours (according to my observation, in that amazing time) they had been about the house before they prevailed to fire it (which they did with flax and hemp, which The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) they brought out of the barn, and there being no defense about the house, only two flankers at two opposite corners and one of them not finished); they fired it once and one ventured The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) out and quenched it, but they quickly fired it again, and that took. Now is the dreadful hour come, that I have often heard of (in time of war The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682), as it was the case of others), but now mine eyes see it. Some in our house were fighting for their lives, others wallowing in their blood, the house on fire over our heads, and The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) the bloody heathen ready to knock us on the head, if we stirred out. Now might we hear mothers and children crying out for themselves, and one another, "Lord The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682), what shall we do?" Then I took my children (and one of my sisters', hers) to go forth and leave the house: but as soon as we came to the door and appeared, the Indians The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) shot so thick that the bullets rattled against the house, as if one had taken an handful of stones and threw them, so that we were fain to give The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) back. We had six stout dogs belonging to our garrison, but none of them would stir, though another time, if any Indian had come to the door, they were ready to fly upon him and The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) tear him down. The Lord hereby would make us the more acknowledge His хэнд, and to see that our help is always in Him. But out we must go The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682), the fire increasing, and coming along behind us, roaring, and the Indians gaping before us with their guns, spears, and hatchets to devour us. No sooner were we out of the house The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682), but my brother-in-law (being before wounded, in defending the house, in or near the throat) fell down dead, whereat the Indians scornfully shouted, and hallowed, and were presently upon him, stripping off his The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) clothes, the bullets flying thick, one went through my side, and the same (as would seem) through the bowels and хэнд of my dear child in my arms. One of my elder The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) sisters' children, named William, had then his leg broken, which the Indians perceiving, they knocked him on [his] head. Thus were we butchered by those merciless heathen, standing amazed, with the The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) blood running down to our heels. My eldest sister being yet in the house, and seeing those woeful sights, the infidels hauling mothers one way, and children another, and some wallowing The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) in their blood: and her elder son telling her that her son William was dead, and myself was wounded, she said, "And Lord, let me die with them," which was no The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) sooner said, but she was struck with a bullet, and fell down dead over the threshold. I hope she is reaping the fruit of her good labors, being faithful to the service of The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) God in her place. In her younger years she lay under much trouble upon spiritual accounts, till it pleased God to make that precious scripture take hold of her heart, "And he The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) said unto me, my Grace is sufficient for thee" (2 Corinthians 12.9). More than twenty years after, I have heard her tell how sweet and comfortable that place was to her. But to The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) return: the Indians laid hold of us, pulling me one way, and the children another, and said, "Come go along with us"; I told them they would kill me: they answered, if I The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) were willing to go along with them, they would not hurt me.


Oh the doleful sight that now was to behold at this house! "Come, behold the works of the Lord The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682), what desolations he has мейд in the earth." Of thirty-seven persons who were in this one house, none escaped either present death, or a bitter captivity, save only one, who might say as The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) he, "And I only am escaped alone to tell the News" (Job 1.15). There were twelve killed, some shot, some stabbed with their spears, some knocked down with their hatchets. When we are The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) in prosperity, Oh the little that we think of such dreadful sights, and to see our dear friends, and relations lie bleeding out their heart-blood upon the ground. There The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) was one who was chopped into the head with a hatchet, and stripped naked, and yet was crawling up and down. It is a solemn sight to see so many Christians lying in their The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) blood, some here, and some there, like a company of sheep torn by wolves, all of them stripped naked by a company of hell-hounds, roaring, singing, ranting, and insulting, as The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) if they would have torn our very hearts out; yet the Lord by His almighty power preserved a number of us from death, for there were twenty-four of us taken The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) alive and carried captive.


I had often before this said that if the Indians should come, I should choose rather to be killed by them than taken alive, but when it came to The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) the trial my mind changed; their glittering weapons so daunted my spirit, that I chose rather to go along with those (as I may say) ravenous beasts, than that moment to end The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) my days; and that I may the better declare what happened to me during that grievous captivity, I shall particularly speak of the several removes we had up and down the wilderness.


The First The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) Remove


Now away we must go with those barbarous creatures, with our bodies wounded and bleeding, and our hearts no less than our bodies. About a mile we went that night, up upon The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) a hill within sight of the town, where they intended to lodge. There was hard by a vacant house (deserted by the English before, for fear of the Indians). I asked them The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) whether I might not lodge in the house that night, to which they answered, "What, will you love English men still?" This was the dolefulest night that ever my eyes saw. Oh The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) the roaring, and singing and dancing, and yelling of those black creatures in the night, which мейд the place a lively resemblance of hell. And as miserable was the waste that was The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) there мейд of horses, cattle, sheep, swine, calves, lambs, roasting pigs, and fowl (which they had plundered in the town), some roasting, some lying and burning, and some boiling to feed our The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) merciless enemies; who were joyful enough, though we were disconsolate. To add to the dolefulness of the former day, and the dismalness of the present night, my thoughts ran upon my losses The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) and sad bereaved condition. All was gone, my husband gone (at least separated from me, he being in the Bay; and to add to my grief, the Indians told The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) me they would kill him as he came homeward), my children gone, my relations and friends gone, our house and home and all our comforts--within door and without--all was gone The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) (except my life), and I knew not but the next moment that might go too. There remained nothing to me but one poor wounded babe, and it seemed at present worse than death that The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) it was in such a pitiful condition, bespeaking compassion, and I had no refreshing for it, nor suitable things to revive it. Little do many think what is the savageness and The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) brutishness of this barbarous enemy, Ay, even those that seem to profess more than others among them, when the English have fallen into their hands.


Those seven that were killed at The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) Lancaster the summer before upon a Sabbath day, and the one that was afterward killed upon a weekday, were slain and mangled in a barbarous manner, by one-eyed John, and Marlborough's Praying Indians The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682), which Capt. Mosely brought to Boston, as the Indians told me.


The Second Remove


But now, the next morning, I must turn my back upon the town, and travel with The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) them into the vast and desolate wilderness, I knew not whither. It is not my tongue, or pen, can express the sorrows of my heart, and bitterness of my spirit that I The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) had at this departure: but God was with me in a wonderful manner, carrying me along, and bearing up my spirit, that it did not quite fail. One of the Indians carried my poor wounded The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) babe upon a horse; it went moaning all along, "I shall die, I shall die." I went on foot after it, with sorrow that cannot be expressed. At length I took The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) it off the horse, and carried it in my arms till my strength failed, and I fell down with it. Then they set me upon a horse with my wounded child The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) in my lap, and there being no furniture upon the horse's back, as we were going down a steep hill we both fell over the horse's head, at which they The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682), like inhumane creatures, laughed, and rejoiced to see it, though I thought we should there have ended our days, as overcome with so many difficulties. But the Lord renewed my strength still, and carried The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) me along, that I might see more of His power; yea, so much that I could never have thought of, had I not experienced it.


After this it quickly The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) began to snow, and when night came on, they stopped, and now down I must sit in the snow, by a little fire, and a few boughs behind me, with my sick The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) child in my lap; and calling much for water, being now (through the wound) fallen into a violent fever. My own wound also growing so stiff that I could scarce sit down or rise The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) up; yet so it must be, that I must sit all this cold winter night upon the cold snowy ground, with my sick child in my arms, looking that every hour would The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) be the last of its life; and having no Christian friend near me, either to comfort or help me. Oh, I may see the wonderful power of God, that my Spirit The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) did not utterly sink under my affliction: still the Lord upheld me with His gracious and merciful spirit, and we were both alive to see the light of the next morning.


The Third The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) Remove


The morning being come, they prepared to go on their way. One of the Indians got up upon a horse, and they set me up behind him, with my poor sick babe The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) in my lap. A very wearisome and tedious day I had of it; what with my own wound, and my child's being so exceeding sick, and in a lamentable condition with The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) her wound. It may be easily judged what a poor feeble condition we were in, there being not the least crumb of refreshing that came within either of our mouths from Wednesday The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) night to Saturday night, except only a little cold water. This day in the afternoon, about an hour by sun, we came to the place where they intended, viz. an Indian town, called The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) Wenimesset, northward of Quabaug. When we were come, Oh the number of pagans (now merciless enemies) that there came about me, that I may say as David, "I had fainted The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682), unless I had believed, etc" (Psalm 27.13). The next day was the Sabbath. I then remembered how careless I had been of God's holy time; how many Sabbaths I had lost and misspent, and The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) how evilly I had walked in God's sight; which lay so close unto my spirit, that it was easy for me to see how righteous it was with God The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) to cut off the thread of my life and cast me out of His presence forever. Yet the Lord still showed mercy to me, and upheld me; and as He wounded me with one The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) хэнд, so he healed me with the other. This day there came to me one Robert Pepper (a man belonging to Roxbury) who was taken in Captain Beers's fight, and had The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) been now a considerable time with the Indians; and up with them almost as far as Albany, to see King Philip, as he told me, and was now very lately come The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) into these parts. Hearing, I say, that I was in this Indian town, he obtained leave to come and see me. He told me he himself was wounded in the The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) leg at Captain Beer's fight; and was not able some time to go, but as they carried him, and as he took oaken leaves and laid to his wound, and through the The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) blessing of God he was able to travel again. Then I took oaken leaves and laid to my side, and with the blessing of God it cured me also; yet before The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) the cure was wrought, I may say, as it is in Psalm 38.5-6 "My wounds stink and are corrupt, I am troubled, I am bowed down greatly, I go mourning all the day long." I The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) sat much alone with a poor wounded child in my lap, which moaned night and day, having nothing to revive the body, or cheer the spirits of her, but instead of The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) that, sometimes one Indian would come and tell me one hour that "your master will knock your child in the head," and then a second, and then a third, "your master The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) will quickly knock your child in the head."


[…]


Our family being now gathered together (those of us that were living), the South Church in Boston hired an house for us. Then we The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) Removed from Mr. Shepard's, those cordial friends, and went to Boston, where we continued about three-quarters of a year. Still the Lord went along with us, and provided graciously for us. I The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) thought it somewhat strange to set up house-keeping with bare walls; but as Solomon says, "Money answers all things" and that we had through the benevolence of Christian friends The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682), some in this town, and some in that, and others; and some from England; that in a little time we might look, and see the house furnished with love. The Lord hath been exceeding good The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) to us in our low estate, in that when we had neither house nor home, nor other necessaries, the Lord so moved the hearts of these and those towards us, that The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) we wanted neither food, nor raiment for ourselves or ours: "There is a Friend which sticketh closer than a Brother" (Proverbs 18.24). And how many such friends have we found, and now The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) living amongst? And truly such a friend have we found him to be unto us, in whose house we lived, viz. Mr. James Whitcomb, a friend unto us near хэнд, and afar off.


I The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) can remember the time when I used to sleep quietly without workings in my thoughts, whole nights together, but now it is other ways with me. When all are fast The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) about me, and no eye open, but His who ever waketh, my thoughts are upon things past, upon the awful dispensation of the Lord towards us, upon His wonderful power and The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) might, in carrying of us through so many difficulties, in returning us in safety, and suffering none to hurt us. I remember in the night season, how the other day I was in the midst The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) of thousands of enemies, and nothing but death before me. It is then hard work to persuade myself, that ever I should be satisfied with bread again. But now we are fed The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) with the finest of the wheat, and, as I may say, with honey out of the rock. Instead of the husk, we have the fatted calf. The thoughts of these things in The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) the particulars of them, and of the love and goodness of God towards us, make it true of me, what David said of himself, "I watered my Couch with my tears The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682)" (Psalm 6.6). Oh! the wonderful power of God that mine eyes have seen, affording matter enough for my thoughts to run in, that when others are sleeping mine eyes are weeping.


I have The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) seen the extreme vanity of this world: One hour I have been in health, and wealthy, wanting nothing. But the next hour in sickness and wounds, and death, having nothing but The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) sorrow and affliction.


Before I knew what affliction meant, I was ready sometimes to wish for it. When I lived in prosperity, having the comforts of the world about me, my relations The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) by me, my heart cheerful, and taking little care for anything, and yet seeing many, whom I preferred before myself, under many trials and afflictions, in sickness, weakness, poverty, losses, crosses, and cares of The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) the world, I should be sometimes jealous least I should have my portion in this life, and that Scripture would come to my mind, "For whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682), and scourgeth every Son whom he receiveth" (Hebrews 12.6). But now I see the Lord had His time to scourge and chasten me. The portion of some is to have their The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) afflictions by drops, now one drop and then another; but the dregs of the cup, the wine of astonishment, like a sweeping rain that leaveth no food, did the Lord prepare to be my portion The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682). Affliction I wanted, and affliction I had, full measure (I thought), pressed down and running over. Yet I see, when God calls a person to anything, and through never so The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) many difficulties, yet He is fully able to carry them through and make them see, and say they have been gainers thereby. And I hope I can say in some measure, as David did The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682), "It is good for me that I have been afflicted." The Lord hath showed me the vanity of these outward things. That they are the vanity of vanities, and vexation of The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) spirit, that they are but a shadow, a blast, a bubble, and things of no continuance. That we must rely on God Himself, and our whole dependance must be upon The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) Him. If trouble from smaller matters begin to arise in me, I have something at хэнд to check myself with, and say, why am I troubled? It was but the other day The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) that if I had had the world, I would have given it for my freedom, or to have been a servant to a Christian. I have learned to look beyond present and smaller troubles, and The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) to be quieted under them. As Moses said, "Stand still and see the salvation of the Lord" (Exodus 14.13).


Finis.


Go to the full text of Rowlandson's narrative, The Narrative of The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, online at the Gutenberg Project.


Prepared by Professor Catherine Lavender for Honors 502 (American Frontiers and Borderlands), Department of History, The College The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682) of Staten Island of The City University of New York. Send email to lavender@postbox.csi.cuny.edu

Last modified: Saturday, 19 August 2000.


Source: http://www.library.csi.cuny.edu/dept/history/lavender/rownarr.html The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682)




the-return-of-the-oracle-14-glava.html
the-return-of-the-oracle-19-glava.html
the-return-of-the-oracle-24-glava.html